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An electrician has told parents to remove plug socket covers in order to protect their toddlers from being exposed to 230V currents.

Parents have been warned that children can seriously harm themselves on ‘horrible, unsafe’ covers – despite the fact they’re meant to act as protection.

Children inadvertently use these covers to open up live conductors, an electrician has warned after seeing his two young son’s playing with them like ‘jigsaws’.  

An electrician has told parents to remove plug socket covers  in order to protect their toddlers from being exposed to 230V currents. Mr Palmer posted a video on Facebook showing his sons removing covers (pictured)

An electrician has told parents to remove plug socket covers in order to protect their toddlers from being exposed to 230V currents. Mr Palmer posted a video on Facebook showing his sons removing covers (pictured)

ELECTRIC SHOCKS AT HOME

In children 12 years or younger household appliances cause more than 63 per cent of injuries.

In case of electric shock, the main power should immediately be shut off.

A child who has suffered electric shock may have very little external injury.

Potential burns are most severe at the point where they have contact with the electric source.

If the child has chest pain, abdominal pain or shortness of breath they could have internal injuries.

Parents should call a doctor if they notice a burn to the skin, numbness, tinging or problems with speech, vision or hearing.

A doctor should always look at electric cord burns in the mouth. A person shocked by high voltage (above 500 volts) should be seen in the emergency department of a hospital.

Source: Encyclopedia of Children’s Health  

Father-of-five Steve Palmer urged parents to do away with the devices which he says are incredibly dangerous to small children and ‘need to go in the bin’.

Mr Palmer, who works at JPS Electrical Services in Bristol posted a video on Facebook showing how easily his sons Jayden and Preston, one and three respectively, can remove covers, writes Nottingham Post.

‘These sockets go through vigorous testing…to make sure that they are safe.

‘You don’t need (plug socket cover) to make it safe’, he said.

He says placing a prong into the top pin can open up the live socket, therefore exposing children to a 230V current.

‘In fact, what you are actually doing, is giving your child a tool that will allow them to open up the live conductors’, said Mr Palmer.

In children 12 years or younger household appliances cause more than 63 per cent of injuries. 

‘It could stay like that for days, weeks, possibly even a month, in which time your child has found something small and conductive, perhaps metal and they’ve come along and put it in (the socket).’

The video Mr Palmer posted on Facebook has now been viewed more than one million times.

‘These things are a tool for your child to cause some serious harm to themselves. Chances are it might not happen but why live in ifs, buts and maybes?

Children inadvertently use these covers (pictured) to open up live conductors, an electrician has warned after seeing his two young son's playing with them like 'jigsaws'

Children inadvertently use these covers (pictured) to open up live conductors, an electrician has warned after seeing his two young son's playing with them like 'jigsaws'

Children inadvertently use these covers (pictured) to open up live conductors, an electrician has warned after seeing his two young son’s playing with them like ‘jigsaws’

In case of electric shock, the main power should immediately be shut off. 

A child who has suffered electric shock may have very little external injury.

Potential burns are most severe at the point where they have contact with the electric source.

If the child has chest pain, abdominal pain or shortness of breath they could have internal injuries.

Parents should call a doctor if they notice a burn to the skin, numbness, tinging or problems with speech, vision or hearing.

A doctor should always look at electric cord burns in the mouth. 

A person shocked by high voltage (above 500 volts) should be seen in the emergency department of a hospital.

 



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